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4 Critical Steps to Mobile Security (iPhones, iPads, Laptops)

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Is your favorite gadget burning your bottom line?

No, I’m not referring to the unproductive hours you spend on Angry Birds. I’m talking about mobile security.

Why is Mobile Security So Vital?

Think about the most indispensible gadget you use for work – the one without which you cannot survive. I’m taking a calculated guess here, but I bet your list doesn’t include a photocopier, fax or even a desktop computer. Business people have become highly dependent on digital devices that keep them connected, efficient, flexible and independent no matter where they are. In other words, we are addicted to our mobile gadgets: iPhones, Droids, BlackBerrys, iPads, tablets, laptops and the corresponding Wi-Fi connections that link us to the business world.

To stay nimble and ahead of the game, we must be able to respond to any request (a call, email, social media post, text message), research anything (a client’s background, solutions to a problem) and stay current on what’s happening in our field of influence (breaking news, tweets) even when we are out of the office.

But the same gadgets that give us a distinct competitive advantage, if left unprotected, can give data thieves and unethical competitors a huge and unfair criminal advantage. The net result of organizational data theft can be devastating to your job security, your bottom line, and your long-term reputation. The solution, of course, is to proactively protect your mobile office, whether it’s digital, physical or both. Mobile security is not optional.

Data Thieves Target Mobile Offices

What is a mobile office? If you own any of the gadgets listed above and use them even in minor ways for work (checking email, surfing, social media), you have a mobile office. Smartphones and tablets are more powerful than the desktops of just three years ago. Laptops are the bull’s eye for data thieves, though their attention is quickly moving to smaller, easier-to-steal gadgets. If you work out of your car, travel for your company or have a home office in addition to your regular workplace, you are a mobile worker.

Ignoring the call to protect these devices is no different than operating your office computer without virus protection, passwords, security patches or even the most basic physical protection.  If you do nothing about the risk, you will get stung, and in the process, may lose your job, your profits and potentially even your company. The threat isn’t idle – I lost my business because I refused to acknowledge the power of information and the importance of protecting it like gold.

To protect yourself and your company from becoming victims of mobile data theft, start with the 4 Critical Steps to Defend Your Mobile Gadgets:

  1. Make sure that employees aren’t installing data hijacking apps (like the Chess app that was pulled from the Android Marketplace because it was siphoning bank account logins off of users’ smartphones) on their smartphones and tablets thinking that they are harmless games.
  2. Implement basic mobile security on all mobile devices, including: secure passwords, remote tracking and wiping, auto-lock, auto-wipe and call-in account protection.
  3. Only utilize protected Wi-Fi connections to access the web. Free hotspots are constantly monitored by data sniffers looking to piggyback into your corporate website.
  4. Don’t ignore non-digital data theft risks like client files left in cars, hotel rooms and off-site offices. The tendency to over-focus on digital threats leaves your physical flank (documents, files, paper trash, etc.) exposed.

John Sileo is an award-winning author and international speaker on the dark art of deception (identity theft, data privacy, social media manipulation) and its polar opposite, the powerful use of trust, to achieve success. He is CEO of The Sileo Group, which advises teams on how to multiply performance by building a culture of deep trust. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer, the FDIC, and Homeland Security. Sample his Keynote Presentation (he shares how he lost $300,000, 2 years and his business to data breach) or watch him on Anderson Cooper, 60 Minutes or Fox Business. 1.800.258.8076.

Mobile Security Webinar: Defending SmartPhones, iPads, Laptops Against Cyber Attacks

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Cyber Attack Webinar - John Sileo

  • Are iPhones, Droids and BlackBerry mobile phones secure enough to be used for sensitive business?
  • What is App Hijacking and how do I keep it from stealing all of my GPS coordinates, contacts, logins and emails?
  • Given that laptops account for almost 50% of workplace data theft, how do I protect myself and my company?
  • Are Wi-Fi Hot Spots a recipie for data hijacking disaster and what is the alternative?
  • How do I protect my personal and professional files that live in the cloud (Gmail, DropBox)?

Free Webinar – Cyber Attack: Data Defense for Your Mobile Office

In the information economy, tools like the iPad, WiFi and smartphones have shifted the competitive landscape in favor of mobile-savvy businesses. But are you in control of your information, or are you being controlled? Learn how to be in control of your critical information while protecting your business’ mobile-digital assets.

This Webinar series, sponsored by Deluxe®, is a multi-part interactive Webinar series designed to address these topics and provide simple, actionable tools to protect and enhance the efficiency with which you run your business.

In this class, Cyber Attack: Data Defense for your Mobile Office, you will learn how to:

  • Protect smartphones and tablets from common attacks, including app hijacking, Wi-fi Sniffing, Link Jacking and other criminal tools.
  • Weigh the pros and cons of cloud-computing model (Gmail, SalesForce, online billing).
  • Lock down Wi-Fi data leakage in the office and on the road.
  • Protect your traveling office in hotel rooms, airports and off-site offices

Interactive Q & A to follow. All registrants will receive a FREE Whitepaper after the webinar.

Tuesday, January 31, 2:00 – 3:00 pm EST | 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm CST | 11:00 am – 12:00 pm PST

iPhone and Droid Want to Be Your Big Brother

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Remember the iconic 1984 Super Bowl ad with Apple shattering Big Brother? How times have changed! Now they are Big Brother.

According to recent Wall Street Journal findings, Apple Inc.’s iPhones and Google Inc.’s Android smartphones regularly transmit your locations back to Apple and Google, respectively. This new information only intensifies the privacy concerns that many people already have regarding smartphones. Essentially, they know where you are anytime your phone is on, and can sell that to advertisers in your area (or will be selling it soon enough).

The actual answer here is for the public to put enough pressure on Apple and Google that they stop the practice of tracking our location-based data and no longer collect, store or transmit it in any way without our consent.

You may ask, “don’t all cell phone carriers know where you are due to cell tower usage?” Yes, but Google and Apple are not cell phone carriers, they are software and hardware designers and should have no real reason (other than information control) to be tracking your every move without your knowledge. Google and Apple are not AT&T or Verizon, therefore they should not be recording, synching and transmitting your location like it appears they are.

Both companies are trying to build huge databases that allow them to pinpoint your exact location. So how are they doing it? By recording the cell phone towers and WiFi hotspots that you pass and that your phone utilizes. This data will ultimately be used to help them market location based services to their audience, which is a market that is expected to rise $6 billion in the next 3 years.

The Wall Street Journal found through research by security analyst Samy Kamkar, the HTC Android phone collected its location every few seconds and transmitted the data to Google at least several times an hour. It transmitted the name, location and signal strength of any nearby WiFi networks, as well as a unique phone identifier. This was not as personal of information like what the Street-View cars collected that Google had to shut down some time ago.

So what do we do now? According to the Wall Street Journal, neither Apple or Google commented when contacted about these findings, so it is hard to know the extent of how they are using the data collected. Right now, there really isn’t much you can do to stop GPS tracing of your location without your consent. Of course you could power down your phone, but we are all way too additcted to these handy little digital Swiss Army Knives to do that. You can turn of GPS services, but again, that makes it impossible to use maps and other location-based apps.

The actual answer here is for the public to put enough pressure on Apple and Google that they stop the practice of tracking our location-based data and no longer collect, store or transmit it in any way without our consent.

While this may be the future of privacy, it is better that we are aware of what may come rather than remain in the dark about the possibilities of technology.

John Sileo is the President of The Sileo Group and the award winning author of four books, including his latest workbook, The Smartphone Survival Guide. He speaks around the world on identity theft, online reputation and influence. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer and Homeland Security. Learn more at www.ThinkLikeASpy.com.

Smartphone Survival Guide Now Available For The Kindle!

Identity Theft Expert John Sileo has partnered with Amazon.com for a limited time to offer the Smartphone Survival Guide for Kindle at 1/4 of the retail price.

Click Here to Order Today!

The Smartphone Survival Guide: 10 Critical Tips in 10 Minutes

Smartphones are the next wave of data hijacking. Let this Survival Guide help you defend yourself before it’s too late.

Smartphones are quickly becoming the fashionable (and simplest) way for thieves to steal private data. Case in point: Google was recently forced to remove 21 popular Android apps from its official application website, Android Market, because the applications were built to look like useful software but acted like electronic wiretaps. At first glance, apps like Chess appear to be legitimate, but when installed, turn into a data-hijacking machine that siphons private information back to the developer.

The Smartphone Survival Guide gives you extensive background knowledge on many of the safety and privacy issues that plague Smartphones, including iPhone, BlackBerry, Android and Windows Phone. Mobile computing is an indispensable tool in the modern world of constant connectivity, but you must protect these powerful tools. Mobile access to the web is here to stay, but we must learn to harness and control it. So whether you are reading this to help protect your own personal Smartphone, or valuable corporate assets, the Smartphone Survival Guide will start you in the right direction.

John Sileo’s Smartphone Survival Guide was recently mentioned in the New York Times.

John Sileo is the President of The Sileo Group and the award winning author of four books, including his latest workbook, The Smartphone Survival Guide. He speaks around the world on identity theft, online reputation and influence. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer and Homeland Security. Learn more at www.ThinkLikeASpy.com.


Stupid App Usage Makes Your Smartphone a Fraud Magnet

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With the recent avalanche of digital convenience and mass centralization comes our next greatest privacy threat –  the stupid use of Mobile Apps. As a society, we depend on the latest technology and instant connectivity so desperately that we rarely take the time to vet the application software (Apps) we install on our mobile phones (and with the introduction of the Mac App store, on our Macs). But many of the Apps out there have not been time-tested like the software on our computers. As much as we love to bash Microsoft and Adobe, they do have a track record of patching security concerns.

The ability to have all of your information at your fingertips on one device is breathtakingly convenient. My iPhone, for example, is used daily as an email client, web browser, book, radio, iPod, compass, recording device, address book, word processor, blog editor, calculator, camera, high-definition video recorder, to-do list, GPS, map, remote control, contact manager, Facebook client, backup device, digital filing cabinet, travel agent, newsreader and phone… among others (which is why I minimize my stupidity by following the steps I set out in the Smart Phone Survival Guide).

Anytime that much information is stored in one place, it becomes a fraud magnet. Anytime that many individual software programs make it onto a single device (without proper due diligence, i.e., with stupidity), it becomes an easy target for identity thieves and interns from your competitor who happen to buy their coffee at the same Starbucks as you and get paid to nick your phone while you’re in line. And it’s not just criminals trying to take advantage of you. As we’ve learned by the amount of personal information that Apps like [intlink id=”3968″ type=”post”]Pandora[/intlink] drain from your mobile phone, advertisers are just as hungry for your bits and bytes.

In 2010, the number of individuals hacked through applications on their Smartphone rose drastically. Hacks aren’t just gaining access to usernames and passwords on individual applications, they are betting on the numbers and applying those same credentials to crack your bank accounts, investments and credit cards. Admit it, on how many websites do you use the same password? But the real damage comes when company privacy is compromised (customer data, confidential emails, contact lists, access into corporate systems, etc.). It’s so easy to download a new App without thinking about who created it and what terms you agreed to by downloading it (several months ago, two of the top downloaded game Apps were produced by the North Korean government and focused on collecting and transmitting your data back to Communist Central.

As if Stupid App Use by itself isn’t threatening enough,  It is rumored that the next generation of iPads, iPhones and iPod Touchs will have  Near-Field Communication capabilities. NFC is where the device can beam and receive credit card and payment information within 4 inches. It is very similar to how people can [intlink id=”3848″ type=”post”]electronically pickpocket[/intlink] your credit card information using RFID technology. You would be able to swipe your device – or in this case your Smartphone – and be able to withdraw money from your bank account to pay for purchases, or to transfer some of your wealth to dishonest posers.

So what’s the good news? Simple. If you are taking steps to protect your mobile phone, your Apps and yourself, your risk drops below the panic line. Be careful about what Apps you download onto your phone without knowing anything about them. Use discretion when loading data to your phone and ask yourself if you really need to carry that on your handset. Set up a time-out password, remote tracking and wiping capabilities and consider security software and encryption. These basic steps will convince a would be thief to move on to their next victim.

John Sileo is the award-winning author of the Smartphone Survival Guide: 10 Critical Security Tips in 10 Minutes and four other books. He speaks professionally on playing information offense to avoid identity theft, social media exposure, cyber fraud, data breach and reputation manipulation. Learn more at www.ThinkLikeASpy.com.

Identity Theft Expert Releases Smartphone Survival Guide

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In response to the increasing data theft threat posed by Smartphones, identity theft expert John Sileo has released The Smartphone Survival Guide. Because of their mobility and computing power, smartphones are the next wave of data hijacking. iPhone, BlackBerry and Droid users carry so much sensitive data on their phones, and because they are so easily compromised, it’s disastrous when they fall into the wrong hands.

Denver, CO (PRWEB) March 7, 2011

Smartphone Survival Guide

Smartphones are quickly becoming the fashionable (and simplest) way for thieves to steal private data. Case in point: Google was recently forced to remove 21 popular Android apps from it’s official application website, Android Market, because the applications were built to look like useful software but acted like electronic wiretaps. At first glance, apps like Chess appear to be legitimate, but when installed, turn into a data-hijacking machine that siphons private information back to the developer.

In response to this new threat facing iPhone, BlackBerry, Droid and Windows Phone users, identity theft expert John Sileo has just released “The Smartphone Survival Guide: 10 Critical Security Tips in 10 Minutes.”

“Once you download a Trojan app” says Sileo, “the thief has more control over your phone than you do. Your privacy is an open book… your identity, contact list, files, emails, texts, passwords… all of it. This doesn’t just threaten the individual phone owner, it threatens the organizations they work in and the data they handle every day.”

At the heart of the problem is the breathtaking convenience and efficiency provided by mobile phones that have become “Smart” because they also function as computers, books, GPS devices, payment systems, web browsers, radios, iPods and so much more. Unfortunately, blinded by the thrill and functionality of the latest app, users rarely take the time to vet the software that can be installed in seconds, from anywhere.

“There are no significant barriers to entry, for either us OR the thieves,” says Sileo of the app-based model of acquiring new software. “You can read about an app on a web page, download it and be using it in under a minute. And you probably didn’t even have to pay for it… at least with cash.” You’re paying dearly, Sileo

maintains, by trading away private information, surfing habits, bank account numbers or company financials.

The Smartphone Survival Guide outlines the major threats posed by mobile phones with internet access and gives a range of solutions for drastically lowering risk. Sileo points out that most data stolen off of Smartphones isn’t just a technology problem:

“Despite the intoxicating power of technology, the underlying problem is always a human problem. Don’t waste energy trying to fix the gadget – that’s someone else’s responsibility. Focus on the behaviors that allow employees to maintain a healthy balance between productivity and security. Deliberate, focused training has the highest ROI, not obsessing over the latest data leakage.”

The Smartphone Survival Guide describes a range of solutions in a quick and accessible fashion, such as:

  • Turn on auto-lock password protection and corresponding encryption.
  • Enable remote tracking and remote wipe capabilities in case the phone is lost or stolen.
  • Minimize app spying with security software and smart habits.
  • Customize geo-location and application privacy permissions.
  • Be wary of free apps – users are almost always paying with private data.
  • Before downloading an app, ask a few questions: How long has the app been available – long enough for someone else to detect a problem? Is the publisher of the app reputable? Have they produced other successful smartphone applications, or is this their first? Has the app been reviewed by a reputable tech journal?

Smartphones and the data on them are obviously at risk, but it remains to be seen whether users will alter their behavior before it’s too late. If not, it will be but one more example of human choices leading to technological data hijacking.

John Sileo is the President of The Sileo Group and the award winning author of four books, including his latest workbook, The Smartphone Survival Guide. He speaks around the world on identity theft, online reputation and influence. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer and Homeland Security. Learn more at www.ThinkLikeASpy.com.

Trojan Apps Hijack Android App Store

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Google removes 20+ Apps from Android Market, signaling that malware distribution has gone mainstream, and not just for Droids.

The Adroid Operating System is open source – meaning that anyone can create applications without Google’s approval. It boosts innovation, and unlike Apple iPhones or Blackberrys, Droid Apps aren’t bound by all of the rules surrounding the Apple App Store. But this leniency can be exploited by hackers, advertisers and malicious apps. And now those apps aren’t just available on some sketchy off-market website, but on the Android Market itself. As smartphones and tablets become one of the primary ways we conduct business, including banking, this development shifts the security conversation into high gear.

A recent discovery forced Google to pull 21 popular and free apps from the Android Market. According to the company, the apps are malware and focused on getting root access to the user’s device (giving them more control over your phone than even you have). Kevin Mahaffey, the CTO of Lookout, a maker of security tools for mobile devices, explained the Android malware discovery in a recent PC World article (emphasis mine):

“DroidDream is packaged inside of seemingly legitimate applications posted to the Android Market in order to trick users into downloading it… Unlike previous instances of malware in the wild… DroidDream was available in the official Android Market, indicating a growing need for mainstream consumers to be aware of the apps they download and to actively protect their smartphones.”

An example of a Trojan App, as I like to call it (because it hides an attack beneath a harmless – or even attractive – exterior), is a Droid app simply called “Chess.” The user downloads it assuming that it will allow them to play chess on their phone. Once downloaded, however, the app assumes root control of the device, transmits highly sensitive user data back to the author and leave a ‘Back Door’ open to allow further malicious code to be added to the phone at any time. Disguising malicious apps as legitimate and popular software is what makes this game so easy and profitable for hackers. That the apps are then available on a well known app site (run by Google), gives them an air of legitimacy.

Here are several tips from The Smartphone Survival Guide to help you begin protecting your mobile phone, whether it is a Droid, iPhone, BlackBerry or Windows Phone:

  • Be wary of free apps – almost all of them, legitimate and otherwise – are siphoning your information to the developers.
  • Before you download an app, perform a bit of due diligence, including but not limited to:
  • If it hasn’t been out for long enough to have been tested, don’t download it (let the marketplace approve it first)
  • Research the publisher of the App to see if they have a clean track record.
  • Perform a Google search for reputable reviews on the app (Macworld, PC Magazine, PC World, Wall Street Journal).
  • Don’t automatically believe the reviews on established App Stores (Apple, Android, BlackBerry, Windows) as they are often written by the developer (or malware author).
  • Realize that legitimate, fully vetted apps like Pandora are siphoning your information too, though in a more benign way.
  • Always check your app permission settings (if available) to see what information they are forwarding back to the creator of the app.
  • Install security software on your phone (if available).

Smartphone Survival GuideRemember, all apps are not malicious, just a small fraction are bad apples. And Android isn’t the only source of this problem, it’s simply the most open of the App platforms and therefore more susceptible. Apple has pretty Draconian rules for getting apps approved, which has helped minimize exposure on iPhones. But if you aren’t taking steps to educate yourself about this latest and greatest fraud source, you’re going to get stung.

John Sileo is the award-winning author of the Smartphone Survival Guide: 10 Critical Security Tips in 10 Minutes and four other books. He speaks professionally on playing information offense to avoid identity theft, social media exposure, cyber fraud, data breach and reputation manipulation. His clients include the Department of Defense, Pfizer and Homeland Security. Learn more at www.ThinkLikeASpy.com.