GameOver Zeus Virus Test

gameover zeus

The original notice on GameOver Zeus appeared on the US-CERT site. If you’d like to go directly to the tests for the GameOver Zeus virus, scroll down.

Overview of GameOver Zeus

GameOver Zeus (GOZ), a peer-to-peer (P2P) variant of the Zeus family of bank credential-stealing malware identified in September 2011, [1] uses a decentralized network infrastructure of compromised personal computers and web servers to execute command-and-control. The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in collaboration with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Justice (DOJ), is releasing this Technical Alert to provide further information about the GameOver Zeus botnet.

Systems Affected by GameOver Zeus Virus

  • Microsoft Windows 95, 98, Me, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, and 8
  • Microsoft Server 2003, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2, and Server 2012

Impact of GameOver Zeus

A system infected with GOZ may be employed to send spam, participate in DDoS attacks, and harvest users’ credentials for online services, including banking services.

Solutions to GameOver Zeus

Users are recommended to take the following actions to remediate GOZ infections:

  • Use and maintain anti-virus software – Anti-virus software recognizes and protects your computer against most known viruses. It is important to keep your anti-virus software up-to-date.
  • Change your passwords – Your original passwords may have been compromised during the infection, so you should change them
  • Keep your operating system and application software up-to-date – Install software patches so that attackers can’t take advantage of known problems or vulnerabilities. Many operating systems offer automatic updates. If this option is available, you should enable it
  • Use anti-malware tools – Using a legitimate program that identifies and removes malware can help eliminate an infection. Users can consider employing a remediation tool (examples below) that will help with the removal of GOZ from your system.

F-Secure is external) (Windows Vista, 7 and 8) is external) (Windows XP)

Heimdal is external) (Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1)   

McAfee is external) (Windows XP SP2, 2003 SP2, Vista SP1, 2008, 7 and 8)

Microsoft is external) (Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP)

Sophos is external) (Windows XP (SP2) and above) 

Symantec is external) (Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7)

Trend Micro is external) (Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8/8.1, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, and Windows Server 2008 R2)

FireEye and Fox-IT is external) FireEye and Fox-IT have created a web portal claiming to restore/decrypt files of CryptoLocker victims. US-CERT has performed no evaluation of this claim, but is providing a link to enable individuals to make their own determination of suitability for their needs. At present, US-CERT is not aware of any other product that claims similar functionality.

The above are examples only and do not constitute an exhaustive list. The U.S. Government does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.



  • Initial Publication – June 2, 2014
  • Added McAfee – June 6, 2014
  • Added FireEye and Fox-IT web portal to Solutions section – August 15, 2014


John Sileo is an an award-winning author and keynote speaker on cyber security and data breach. He specializes in making security entertaining, so that it works. John is CEO of The Sileo Group, whose clients include the Pentagon, Visa, Homeland Security & Pfizer. John’s body of work includes appearances on 60 Minutes, Rachael Ray, Anderson Cooper & Fox Business. Contact him directly on 800.258.8076.


Posted by Identity Theft Speaker in Cyber Data Security, Identity Theft Prevention and tagged , , , , .

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