Fraud Training: Bored to Tears Yet?

Businesses often make fraud training boring! And that’s bad for their bottom line, because no one ends up remembering anything about the subject.

Too often, fraud and social engineering workshops cover just the concepts that define fraud rather than the feelings that signal it’s happening. The key to training your executives, employees and even customers on fraud is to let them experience what it feels like to be conned. In other words, they need to actually be socially engineered (manipulated into giving away their own private information) several times throughout the training so that they begin to reflexively sense fraud as it is happening. Like learning to throw a ball, there is no substitute for doing it for yourself. Fraud detection is similar; it takes actually doing it (or having it done to you) to fully understand the warning signs. Anything less will leave your audience yawning and uneducated.

This social engineering video was recorded at a fraud training I did recently for the Department of Defense, and it demonstrates how fun it can be to train someone on detecting fraud, and how profitable. As silly as it might seem, the skills necessary to detect fraud can be taught in very entertaining and engaging ways. After watching the video, take a minute to understand the basic skills your employees and executives will need to Stop Fraud:

Fraud Training Step 1: The Trigger

The trigger, or what causes you to be on high alert, is actually very simple—it is the appearance of private information in any form (your identity, customer information, employee records, intellectual capital, etc.). Anytime someone requests or has access to any of the names, numbers or attributes that make up identity, or to the paper, plastic, digital or human data where identity lives (whether it is yours or your organization’s), the trigger should trip and sound an alarm in your head.

There are hundreds of examples of fraud triggers in the workplace. Here are a few of the more common:

  • When someone is requesting information about you on Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.
  • When someone requests information about your company, computer login or co-workers in person or by phone
  • When you are clicking on a link in an email
  • When you are entering data into a website

When your identity is being requested in any way, slow down and ask yourself: Is the risk of giving this piece of identity away in this specific situation worth the benefit?

Fraud Training Step 2: Hogwash!

Your team should be trained such that anytime their reflex is triggered, a phrase or picture automatically pops into their head, whether they actively think about it or not. If the word (also called a trigger) is a bit out-of-the-ordinary and the picture is humorous, you almost can’t help but noticing when it appears. The trigger that I use when I train is the word HOGWASH! Here is my definition of Hogwash:

Hog’wash |hôg’wô sh | n. 1. A gut reaction that someone is manipulating you for their own gain, or feeding you a line of bull in order to deceive you (e.g., I’ll just borrow your password for a short time); 2. Healthy skepticism that persists until the person requesting information from you proves they are worthy of your trust.

When the word Hogwash pops into your head, picture a pig feeding at a trough. Better yet, picture the person (who is requesting your information) feeding at a trough (the image is what makes it fun and memorable – don’t be afraid of the silliness – it works). As they provide legitimate reasons for needing the information and adequate reassurance that your data will be handled securely, they begin to rise from the trough. But don’t let them off the hook yet, because social engineers are masters at using your natural biases against you.

Fraud Training Step 3: Vigilance

When an outsider has access to your identity or critical business data, your trigger should automatically activate without thinking about it (Hogwash!). Your first response should be to heighten your level of observation, to become more vigilant. View the situation as a child would—with curious eyes. You can even borrow what we teach our children to be more aware in dangerous situations—Stop, Look and Listen:

Listen to your instincts. Ask yourself if your identity is safe. Is there a change in the environment that makes you uneasy or uncertain? What is your gut saying? Would a spy give away this information? Is the benefit you are receiving worth the data you are sharing? Be a healthy skeptic (i.e., not paranoid, but vigilant) of anyone who is requesting sensitive information. The final and most important step is to follow up with the right questions, or interrogate the enemy.

Don’t make privacy a policy, make it part of your culture. Start by engaging your troops, not putting them to sleep.

If you are interested in having John Sileo conduct fraud training and social engineering workshops for your organization, contact him directly on 1.800.258.8076. His satisfied clients include the Department of Defense, the FDIC, Pfizer and the Federal Reserve Bank.

 

Posted by Identity Theft Speaker in Fraud Detection & Prevention, Identity Theft Prevention and tagged , , , , , , , .

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